Tag Archives: Durga

Shakti time! It’s Navratri once again

I always look forward to Navratri, which is celebrated twice a year. Perhaps because it is a true marking of the change of seasons. As I live in Hawai’i, we don’t have much variance in seasonal changes like in the mainland US, so this holiday reminds me that it is fall (or spring). Every night of Navratri I listen to the devotional chants on Youtube and feel the blessings bestowed by each of the manifestations of Durga.

I may have mentioned it in the past, but I have come to really appreciate Skandamata whom I have found through these devotional practices. She is the mother of Skanda, and any reverence given to her gets blessings by both her and Kartikeya. She brings motherly protection and sage advice during difficult times.

I love the concept of Shakti. It is pure energy from the divine feminine source. It gets things done. It ignites action. Perhaps that is why Navratri it is at the front end of each of the equinoxes. It prods us into activity to get through the season.

If you want to follow along with Navratri, I would recommend this creator’s videos. They are animated well and give the story of each of the Nav Durgas.

Many blessings during this auspicious time!

Catching up with Navratri

Autumn is young, and that means we are smack in the middle of a wonderful semi-annual Indian tradition called Navratri (nine nights). In late September or early October, manifestations of Durga in celebrated each of the nine nights. As India Standard Time about a day and half different that where I am, I have to guesstimate which “night” is the correct one for each Durga manifestation.

This year Navratri started on September 29th. The first night celebrates Durga manifestation Shailputri who symbolizes the Hamalayas (the rock name “shale” comes from the this). Next is Brahmacharini, celebrated for doing strict tapas, then Chandraghanta who brings peace. The next night is Kushmanda who brings health and wealth. The fifth night is for Skandamata who is the mother of Skanda. One who does puja for her also gets blessings and boons from her son as well. The sixth night is Katyayani who killed the demon Mahishasur and is the first of the “warrior” Durgas. Next is the fierce Kaalratri who wields a bloody sickle. She is also known as Kali Maa and is not to be trifled with. On the eighth night is Mahagauri who had performed austere penance and was covered in soot. After Shiva washed her being pleased with her practice she was a stark white color. On the ninth and last night there is Siddhidatri who is the giver of boons for those who showed devotion during this nine night time period. The very last night is called Dusshera which celebrates Durga’s victory over evil.

My wife and I like to listen to the different mantras of each Durga during the different nights. We may be getting boons as things have been going much more positively for our family lately and our health has improved.

There are much deeper stories of all of these Durga manifestations. StoRyvival, a youtube channel, has wonderful commentary on each of these manifestations of Durga and other Indian traditions. There are also lots of navratri mantras available on youtube as well. Navaratri is twice a year and the other one is during the springtime.

May you get blessings during this time of year!

Happy Dussehra!

Today is an auspicious day in the Hindu calendar as it marks goddess Durga’s victory over the demon Mahishasura after nine nights and one day of battle. My wife and I were not born into Hindu faith, but we have been observing Navratri for the past two years of the festival. I believe it has helped us withstand the demands we have faced over the past two years with her father’s passing and new caregiving duties of her mother-in-law.

I like how Navratri makes you focus on each aspect of Durga’s shakti. She comes in many forms and all have a distinctly feminine power. She is giving, forbearing, fierce, forgiving, bestowing, and patient among other qualities.

The nice thing about this holiday is it celebrates the feminine as a greater power than masculine. Given the above qualities of Durga’s shakti, this is really true. There are “masculine” mantras and there are “feminine” mantras one can chant. For example the “masculine” ones to Ganesh, Shiva, Vishnu are great for a bhakti practice sustained for a long period of time, but the “feminine” mantras contain the shakti that gets things done with quickness and precision. Very much like my wife and me. I like to sit and think about things, but when the decisive action needs to be made, like Durga, my wife gets it done while I’m just watching with a dropped jaw. I think many men would not admit this, but know it’s true about their female partners.

The last manifestation of Durga during Navratri is Siddhidatri, or the one who bestows the eight powers mentioned in the third Pada of the Patanjali Yoga Sutras. She is said to have even given Shiva his powers. If one is ardent in one’s practice, siddhi-s are bestowed upon the practitioner.

I find that these festivals and rituals give deep meaning to my yoga practice as they have done for others for centuries. Even simply reading about them ties up a lot of loose ends one may find in studying the Yoga Sutras or Bhagavad Gita. Yoga has such a rich and deep history, to not recognize these other parts of it aside from asana practice limits one’s ability to make these connections. And only practicing one limb gives only one flavor to a practice that is supposed to contain all the flavors of the cornucopia.

Happy Dessehra/Vijayadashami!